Planting Rose Bushes

Awesome eye-catchers planted for eternity 


Not only bloomage makes rose bushes valuable garden-wood, but with their habit they place spectacular emphasis on a garden. Nevertheless, when it comes to planting rose bushes, several fundamentals of rose gardening must be respected.

I don’t want to sound like a real-estate broker, but location is most important to get the best results from your plants:

  • 5-6 hours of sun per day
  •  Good drainage
  • Fertile soil

Shady places or soggy soil will turn the most beautiful rose into a shabby shrub full of diseases and pests. No hobby-gardener wants to deal with ugly rose shrubs

Steps For Planting Rose Bushes

I have explained every single step in my Guide To Growing Roses For Beginners and this will apply to rose bushes with bare roots too. 

One word of caution: As rose bushes tend to grow as high as 4-7 feet they need a lot of space to grow. Most websites and experts will tell you to plant them far apart, so they don’t touch each other.

Big gaps between roses don’t look good. I like my rose bushes look like a sea of blossoms, when they grow into each other and immingle. That’s why I prefer a spacing of about 20-30 inches maximum.

What about proper air circulation to prevent diseases? Buy robust and disease resistant roses and an easy rose gardening will be guaranteed.



Rose bushes as Hedges  

Roses are popular grown as boundary hedges. With less maintenance care you will get a hedge, a fence or a screening and don’t forget the fragrances and the colors.

Planning is Everything

Before you make a selection from the almost overwhelming array of different kinds of roses, you should - as with all other plantings too - consider the conditions of your garden:

  • Soil and light conditions of your green paradise?
  • Want the hedge wild romantic-proliferating or prefer something stricter?
  • The high of the hedge
  • The color of the blossoms

Visit exhibition gardens and check internet sources and mail order catalogs to find some extraordinary flowers.

Which Rose Bush to Choose?

Leander-David Austin

If the bushes should be high, a very good choice would be Leander-Roses from David Austin, Alba Roses and also park and shrub roses like the Westerland or Snow White.

For low growing bushes you could use old Remontant Roses.

Except of Hybrid Teas, nearly every rose can be used as a hedge.

Low-maintenance and hardy roses are Wild-Roses, but they can be very dominant. The Rugosas would be a very good example for that.

If there is already a hedge and you only need some colorful amendment, just replace some of the plants by strong growing roses such as Pink Moyesii or Pink Macrophylla.



› Planting Rose Bushes

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